Categories
American Literature

/323/marquezmanwithwings.htm

These are the link for all of the stories
– “The Lady with a Little Dog” (one story in a larger collection) by Anton Chekhov:
https://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/13415/pg13415
-images.html#THE_LADY_WITH_THE_DOG
The Yellow Wall-Paper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1952/1952-h/1952-h.htm
“A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel
Garcia Marquez:
https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~cinichol/CreativeWriting
/323/MarquezManwithWings.htm
“Gusev”: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1944/1944-h/1944-h.htm#link2H_4_0009
“To Room Nineteen”:
https://blogs.acu.edu/1020_HCOR140H1/files/2010/03/
To-Room-Nineteen-Doris-Lessing.pdf
“The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”:
https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~cinichol/CreativeWriting
/423/MarquezHandsomestDrownedMan.htm

Categories
American Literature

Write an analytical essay that considers in detail one of these accusations against roth and his book.

Philip Roth’s American Pastoral has been criticized from at least three points of view:
(1) It has been called sexist in its portrayal of women characters.
(2) It has been called racist in its depiction of the 1967 Newark riots and aftermath.
(3) It has been called a trivialization of the 1960s protest movement against the Vietnam War.
Write an analytical essay that considers in detail one of these accusations against Roth and his book.
You can find American Pastoral guilty, partially guilty, or innocent of the accusation you choose. If
you consider the accusation inaccurate or unfair, you should at least indicate that you understand why
someone might make the accusation before you then go on to dispute it.
With #2 and #3 above, you will probably want to do some research to see what you can learn about the
Newark riots or the protest movement of the 60s. You should document with citations any use that you
make of outside sources. But you are not being asked to write a research paper. Your argument is
about the novel, and your main evidence for that argument should be textual evidence in the novel itself.
Here is an extra piece of advice I keep forgetting to give you. Do not title your essay “Paper 3.” Use
an actual title, one that suggests your topic and approach.

Categories
American Literature

Not 100% sure of the length and assignment yet.

not 100% sure of the length and assignment yet. I wanted to see if anyone out here is very familiar in writing about Macbeth.

Categories
American Literature

What is rest?

In response to one of the prompts below, write an organized, well-developed essay with a thesis, an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion that supports its claim with specific material cited from the text. All internal citations, plus a works cited page, should be made according to MLA standards (shown below).
Example: When Beowulf questions Hrothgar about the attack by Grendel’s mother, Hrothgar replies, “Rest? What is rest? Sorrow has returned” (1322).
Without exception, the paper must include the following:
Thesis Statement – You must make an identifiable, arguable claim about the text. Your thesis should come at the end of your introductory paragraph.
Textual Evidence – Each point made should be supported directly by relevant quoted or paraphrased material from the primary text. Do not consult secondary sources.
The essay must be three to five (3-5) pages in length and is due in class on November 22.
Belwouf is the only source you need to use and use in text cite

Categories
American Literature

Provide a clearly-labelled working thesis statement.

List the author name(s) and literary work(s) you plan to write about.
Provide a research question. This is the question you most want to answer as you proceed in your research project. (Example Research Questions: What is Homer saying in The Iliad and The Odyssey about suffering and loss during war, and even after? What do Homer’s works collectively suggest about the role of women in that time period?)
Provide a clearly-labelled working thesis statement. This should be a one-sentence declarative statement that clearly announces the purpose/intent of your eventual paper- what is it out to prove in its argument? You might think of this working thesis statement as a possible answer to your research question. (Example Working Thesis Statement: Homer employs harmful gender stereotypes in his depiction of women in both The Iliad and The Odyssey.)
Write a proposal paragraph in which you explain why you are interested in this literature, what led you to this topic, what you hope to learn as you proceed in your research, and any possible challenges or concerns you might face as you work on this project.

Categories
American Literature

You might write a traditional research paper that relies on the insights of various scholars and historians whose essays you have consulted.

The final assignment for this course is an 8-10 page (double-spaced) paper, as indicated on the course syllabus. As also indicated in the syllabus, it will count for 40 percent of your final grade and is due by the day of our last class meeting (December 8). It should be printed out and turned in during our class that day.
The paper will be based on our last major reading in the course, a novel published in 1798 by Charles Brockden Brown: Wieland; or, The Transformation: An American Tale. Brown, born into a Philadelphia Quaker family in 1771 and trained for the law, wrote a series of seven novels in quick succession between 1797 and 1802. Several of the books explore aberrant states of mind or feeling and show a fascination with scientific and medical themes. All of them are set in the United States across the period from before to just after the Revolution, but they also pay attention to the new nation’s Transatlantic ties.
In various ways, they also show a pervasive and important concern with point-of-view as a psychological fact and a literary device. In the case of Wieland, we thus learn of a mass murder through a narrative told by the murderer’s sister (who at one point was another of his intended victims). Brown’s interest in point-of-view was intensely personal, but it accorded well with his period’s rising interest in subjective states of feeling and thought. Especially in America, where the autobiography was even then becoming an important cultural and literary form (think of Ben Franklin, Olaudah Equiano, and St. Jean de Crèvecoeur, for instance), the isolated individual was a figure of considerable importance. As traditional authority in political and cultural terms came under assault, many things seemed to come down to individual choice and individual perception—this was in one sense the nightmare underlying the dream of freedom achieved in the war against Britain. It followed that telling stories involved more than just assembling discrete facts into convincing wholes. The facts themselves might be in dispute, and how they fit together depended in large part on how the teller of any story was disposed to view the world.
In Wieland, the narrator (Clara Wieland) has a very personal investment in her story. For one thing, she wishes to explain her brother Theodore’s murderous actions and, by the manner in which she explains them, to insulate herself from their moral and mental contagion. She thus exaggerates the role that the supposed villain of her story, Francis Carwin, plays in the story. She contends that Carwin contaminated Theodore’s mind, inducing a kind of insanity that led him to commit murder. Otherwise, she seems to fear, the admitted emotional closeness of Clara and Theodore, who have grown up in an isolated home outside Philadelphia, might suggest that her own sanity is at least potentially in doubt. Carwin is not without blame in the actual events chronicled in Clara’s first-person narrative. He has uncanny talents. He can imitate other people’s voices and make it seem that they are speaking from distinct spatial locations. In addition, he is driven by an insatiable, dangerous curiosity that leads him to spy on other characters and repeatedly violate their privacy. Clara, wishing to downplay the potential madness of her brother, finds in these traits a useful dodge. Carwin is in fact a self-centered individual but he is no villain. If he exerts an effect on Theodore, it is mainly by setting in motion impulses that lead Theodore to become unhinged and, believing himself commanded by a divine voice, to murder his family as a sacrifice to God.
In another of his books, Arthur Mervin, Brown chose to tell the whole story by means of what one might call “embedded” first-person narratives: that is, we listen to one narrator who tells us part of the story, but who, on meeting another character, simply quotes that other character’s extensive first-person account of other aspects of the overall story. There is therefore no “omniscient” (all-knowing) narrator, and, it would follow, no epistemological stability in the world of that book.
In the case of Wieland, Brown similarly chose to write Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist, a later sequel to the main plot that is narrated from the viewpoint of Carwin. In this sequel, the villain we have been introduced to in Clara’s narrative emerges as a somewhat less threatening figure. He has the same failings, but we never see him use them for evil purposes. And we are led to imagine a Utopian future for him that will not include the sorts of events we encounter in Wieland.
The assignment here is to use Memoirs of Carwin as a tool for interpreting Wieland. You might write a traditional research paper that relies on the insights of various scholars and historians whose essays you have consulted. But you also might undertake a somewhat more creative approach. For instance, you might choose to write a response from Clara, in her own voice, to what Carwin says in his Memoirs. Or you might adopt Carwin’s voice and viewpoint to answer Clara’s views about his deeds and motives.
I have briefly mentioned this assignment already in class and will continue to do so in future meetings, especially once we begin reading Wieland (from November 29 to the end of the semester). The short, fragmentary Memoirs of Carwin is to be read independently, though on it, on Wieland, and on the project overall I will be available via email and online to provide feedback on your ideas or your publishs.

Categories
American Literature

I need a paper that shows the struggles and atrocities that happened to the civilians in the vietnam war during and after the war, it needs to show proof that there was issues regarding human life or neglect towards a certain group other than that you have fairly free roam on what you got to do

I need a paper that shows the struggles and atrocities that happened to the civilians in the Vietnam war during and after the war, it needs to show proof that there was issues regarding human life or neglect towards a certain group other than that you have fairly free roam on what you got to do

Categories
American Literature

Discuss the effect the settings have on the main characters from each of the stories.

You must respond to both of the stories that you were assigned to read. Your essay must be no less than 500 words. NOTE: Quotations from the stories do NOT count in the 500 words. Pay close attention to the check list given at the beginning of the year.
Discuss the effect the settings have on the main characters from each of the stories. Cite specific evidence that relate to your response. Evaluate each character and hypothesize and produce evidence that interprets/substantiates how each one changes from the beginning to the end. Define those instances that make each character act in the way he does with his wife.
Then summarize the external and internal conflicts that affect each character by citing specific evidence, and more importantly the conflicts or effects from the blind man in “Cathedral” and the stranger in “Young Goodman Brown”.
Cathedral by Raymond Carver
Young Goodman Brown by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Categories
American Literature

Evaluate how kafka characterizes each member of the family throughout the story.

Directions
Read Kafka’s modernist masterpiece, The Metamorphosis. After you’ve read the story, answer the Critical Thinking Questions below.
Literary Terms for Study: Modernism and Characterization
Modernism: Modernism has its roots in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Modernist writers made an intentional break from the traditional styles of poetry and prose that were handed down by previous generations of writers. Writers who embraced this literary movement experimented with form and expression, often trying to incorporate new styles of presenting their material to their audience. Modernist writers made use of various types of writing including stream of consciousness and non-chronological timelines. They tended to focus on the inner workings of a character’s mind and tended to be darker in tone and outlook.
Characterization: Characterization can be defined as the manner in which an author develops characters throughout a work. Some characters are described as “Round,” which means the author gives depth to the character and we see different sides of the character’s personality as he or she undergoes some sort of change. Other characters are described as “Flat,” which means they lack any real depth. Characters that appear in a story for only a short period of time (or serve only a specific purpose) tend to be flat. Flat characters also do not undergo a change in their character.
Critical Thinking Questions:
Answer the questions below in a new Microsoft Word document. Be certain to include your name, course number, and section number, along with the week of the course, at the top of your document. Your answers should be insightful, detailed, and include specific references to the text as a means of supporting your ideas. Answers are to be written in grammatically correct sentences and proper paragraph formats. Do not copy and paste your responses from any outside source; your replies should be original writing that shows me what YOU think. Upload and submit your Word document.
1. Evaluate how Kafka characterizes each member of the family throughout the story. Identify the flat characters. Identify the round characters. What changes take place in the round character(s) from the beginning of the story to the end?
2. Identify the elements of modernism you see in the story and select one. After you’ve chosen the element you would like to examine, discuss how that element is presented throughout the story and evaluate the effect it has on your understanding of that element.
3. There are many interpretations of this story. Consider what you believe your interpretation might be: What point do you think Kafka is saying about “the human condition?”
Part 2: Please have on separate word document. 150 words
Provide a personal response in which you discuss what you liked and did not like about the assigned readings.
Analyze the main points or ideas you learning this week and discuss how interacting with your instructor or classmates helped you build upon or create new learning.
Compare and contrast this week’s concepts with concepts from previous weeks and identify how they relate to your life, community, and/or career.

Categories
American Literature

Consider what you believe your interpretation might be: what point do you think kafka is saying about “the human condition?”

Directions
Read Kafka’s modernist masterpiece, The Metamorphosis. After you’ve read the story, answer the Critical Thinking Questions below.
Literary Terms for Study: Modernism and Characterization
Modernism: Modernism has its roots in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Modernist writers made an intentional break from the traditional styles of poetry and prose that were handed down by previous generations of writers. Writers who embraced this literary movement experimented with form and expression, often trying to incorporate new styles of presenting their material to their audience. Modernist writers made use of various types of writing including stream of consciousness and non-chronological timelines. They tended to focus on the inner workings of a character’s mind and tended to be darker in tone and outlook.
Characterization: Characterization can be defined as the manner in which an author develops characters throughout a work. Some characters are described as “Round,” which means the author gives depth to the character and we see different sides of the character’s personality as he or she undergoes some sort of change. Other characters are described as “Flat,” which means they lack any real depth. Characters that appear in a story for only a short period of time (or serve only a specific purpose) tend to be flat. Flat characters also do not undergo a change in their character.
Critical Thinking Questions:
Answer the questions below in a new Microsoft Word document. Be certain to include your name, course number, and section number, along with the week of the course, at the top of your document. Your answers should be insightful, detailed, and include specific references to the text as a means of supporting your ideas. Answers are to be written in grammatically correct sentences and proper paragraph formats. Do not copy and paste your responses from any outside source; your replies should be original writing that shows me what YOU think. Upload and submit your Word document.
1. Evaluate how Kafka characterizes each member of the family throughout the story. Identify the flat characters. Identify the round characters. What changes take place in the round character(s) from the beginning of the story to the end?
2. Identify the elements of modernism you see in the story and select one. After you’ve chosen the element you would like to examine, discuss how that element is presented throughout the story and evaluate the effect it has on your understanding of that element.
3. There are many interpretations of this story. Consider what you believe your interpretation might be: What point do you think Kafka is saying about “the human condition?”
Part 2: Please have on separate word document. 150 words
Provide a personal response in which you discuss what you liked and did not like about the assigned readings.
Analyze the main points or ideas you learning this week and discuss how interacting with your instructor or classmates helped you build upon or create new learning.
Compare and contrast this week’s concepts with concepts from previous weeks and identify how they relate to your life, community, and/or career.